Chin

Somebody knows: Do you?

Published 12:00am Wednesday, May 1, 2013

In recent weeks, a 15-member cold case task force, which reportedly has law enforcement representatives from across the county, has been actively investigating old cases.

While no official word has been given on what case or cases the group has been investigating, The Star-News in recent days has outlined five of the top “cold” cases. They include:

• The 1978 death of Ed Smith, who was shot twice with the apparent motive of robbery inside his service station in Florala. A man was tried and acquitted in his murder, which has never been officially solved.

• The 1994 death of 65-year-old James Quitman “Nibby” Barton. Barton was found dead from a single gunshot wound to the chest inside the Heath grocery store that bore his name.

• The 1997 disappearance of then 17-year-old Kimberly Ramer in Opp.

• The 1997 death of James “Jimmy” Williams. An unknown gunman or gunmen shot at a stop sign at the intersection of County Roads 91 and 89. One of the bullets missed the sign, flew through the front door of a chicken house and struck Williams in the abdomen.

• The 2003 death of Colin Douglas Millick, 56, who was found beaten to death in Florala. No motive has been determined. The 56-year-old is buried in a pauper’s grave.

When we researched and wrote about these stories, we called the series “Somebody Knows Something.”

And we believe somebody does. If you have even vague information that might help law enforcement officers solve these murders, please phone the district attorney’s office.

It might be impossible to prosecute the cases, and the perpetrators might even be dead. But the families of these victims would rest easier knowing what happened to their loved ones.

 

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One response to “Somebody knows: Do you?”

  1. galatians5.6bniv

    To the investigators, be aware that latent prints from the Barton case, and maybe more of the cases, were entered into the Andalusia PD automated fingerprint identification system and ran against state files at the time; but I am sure that the available state and federal fingerprint databases have grown greatly over the past decade and a re-check now might be of value to the re-opened investigation(s). It would be nice if the unidentified latent prints could now be identified.

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