Here’s your sign: Right-of-way must be clear

Published 12:17am Friday, June 14, 2013

If you own a business, here’s your sign: Back off the right-of-way.

Larry Turman of the state Department of Transportation reminded business owners and churches this week that portable or temporary signs are legal only if they are within 500 feet of the business and off of the state right of way.

“On-premise advertising is legal,” Turman said. “But a lot of stuff gets spread out. If you put a sign a mile down the road, cluttering up the intersection, that’s illegal.”

Turman said the state DOT finds itself policing signs advertising events two to three weeks after the events are over.

“If you’re going to put out yard sale signs, or vacation Bible school signs, pick them up after it’s over,” he said.

The state right-of-way is generally 50 to 75 feet from the center line of the highway, he said.

“When people put up these banners on metal posts (in the right-of-way), they take liability if someone runs off the road and hits the metal post,” he said.

If the DOT picks up the banners or signs, the sign goes in the dumpster and the metal posts become the property of the state.

Anything that is further than 500 feet away from the business is illegal and encroaching on someone else’s property, he said.

For questions about signs on the state right-of-way, call 222-5555 or 606-4771.

 

City ordinance, 15 SF.

 

 

If you own a business, here’s your sign: Back off the right-of-way.

Larry Turman of the state Department of Transportation reminded business owners and churches this week that portable or temporary signs are legal only if they are within 500 feet of the business and off of the state right of way.

“On-premise advertising is legal,” Turman said. “But a lot of stuff gets spread out. If you put a sign a mile down the road, cluttering up the intersection, that’s illegal.”

Turman said the state DOT finds itself policing signs advertising events two to three weeks after the events are over.

“If you’re going to put out yard sale signs, or vacation Bible school signs, pick them up after it’s over,” he said.

The state right-of-way is generally 50 to 75 feet from the center line of the highway, he said.

“When people put up these banners on metal posts (in the right-of-way), they take liability if someone runs off the road and hits the metal post,” he said.

If the DOT picks up the banners or signs, the sign goes in the dumpster and the metal posts become the property of the state.

Anything that is further than 500 feet away from the business is illegal and encroaching on someone else’s property, he said.

“We’re not trying to be bad people,” Turman said. “I’ve got a business, and I understand.”

But the signs are a particular problem when crews are trying to keep right-of-ways cut in the summer, he said.

For questions about signs on the state right-of-way, call 222-5555 or 606-4771.

 

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